Seminars


Seminars

On an irregular basis various Special Seminars take place at the MPQ. The seminars are organized by scientists of our divisions, administration or staff representatives. The location will be announced with the event.

Integrated nonlinear optics and Inverse-designed multimode photonics

In this talk, we will discuss new opportunities involving chip-scale nonlinear optics along with inverse-designed photonic circuits for multi-dimensional information processing. As a specific example, I will introduce recent experiments where we demonstrate natively error-free terabit/s data transmission using integrated frequency combs and multimode silicon photonics. [more]

Special Seminar: Absolute Measurement of a THz Transition Frequency Referenced to a Magnetic Dipolar Transition in Ca+ ion

Special Seminar: Absolute Measurement of a THz Transition Frequency Referenced to a Magnetic Dipolar Transition in Ca+ ion
A three-photon Coherent Population Trapping is observed by the dark line it induces on the laser induced fluorescence of a laser-cooled Ca+ ion cloud. This dark line is referenced to a magnetic dipolar transition at 1.8 THz, between two fine-structure sub-state of a metastable state. We explore the performance of such a system for frequency metrology in the THz domain. [more]

Quantum Photonics for Quantum Machine Learning, Secure Computing, and Precision Measurements

This talk presents recent experimental demonstrations that use integrated nanophotonic processors for various quantum computations such as quantum machine learning and in particular reinforcement learning, where agents interact with environments by exchanging signals via a communication channel. We show that this exchange allows boosting the learning of the agent. [more]

Analog Quantum Simulation: from physics to chemistry (Ignacio Cirac)

Analog Quantum Simulation: from physics to chemistry
Many-body systems are very hard to simulate due to the explosion of parameters with the system size. Quantum computers can help in this task, although one may need scalable systems, something that is out of reach in the short run. An attractive alternative is provided by analog quantum simulators which, even though they are not universal, they can still be tuned to study interesting problems. Atoms in optical lattices seem to be ideally suited for that task. Most of the proposals of such simulators have focused so far on condensed matter or high energy physics problems. In this talk I will show how one can extend the range of problems to other scenarios, especially to quantum chemistry. [more]
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