Colloquia


Colloquia

Due to the current situation (COVID-19), the guest lectures of the MPQ Colloquium will only take place online until further notice. Details on participation will be sent via the mailing lists [wiss-mpq] and [Mpq-colloquium-stream]. Please register using the adjacent link.


Scientific organization of the talks:  Dr. Stephan Dürr and Dr. Thomas Udem

If you wish to view the live stream of the MPQ colloquium, please use the link to subscribe to the corresponding mailing list. Detailed instructions will be sent to all subscribers.

+++ONLINE KOLLOQUIUM+++ Superconducting opto-electronic circuits and applications (Dr. Sonia Buckley)

  • Online kolloquium on July 21th, 2020 at 4:30 p.m. if online only!
  • Date: Jul 21, 2020
  • Time: 16:30
  • Speaker: Dr. Sonia Buckley
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg Maryland, USA
  • Location: +++ONLINE KOLLOQUIUM+++
While traditional computers can simulate the function of the biological brain, this comes at a huge disadvantage in terms of speed and energy use. However, directly emulating the structure of the brain in hardware is extremely challenging due to the very high physical fanout, localized memory and analog/digital hybrid computation. [more]
Attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy provides new insights into the photoelectric effect and gives information about the relative as well as absolute timing of photoemission from different electronic states like core versus valence band states within the electronic band structure of solids. [more]
Single photons can be generated from a single atom strongly coupled to a optical cavity via a stimulated Raman adiabatic passage between two atomic ground states [1]. During the generation of the photon, the atom stays within the dark state of electromagnetically induced transparency(EIT) avoiding spontaneous decay from the excited state. [more]

+++ONLINE KOLLOQUIUM+++ Surprises from Time Crystals (Prof. Vedika Khemani)

Recent years have witnessed a remarkable confluence of diverse areas of physics coming together to inform fundamental questions about many-body quantum matter. A unifying theme in this enterprise has been the study of many-body quantum dynamics in systems ranging from electrons in solids to cold atomic gases to black holes. [more]

+++ONLINE KOLLOQUIUM+++ A subradiant atomic mirror (M. Sc. David Wei)

When quantum emitters are spatially structured on sub-wavelength scales, photon-mediated dipole-dipole interactions can strongly alter the spectral and directional radiative response. Tightly trapped atoms in optical lattices, only coupled to the electromagnetic vacuum, constitute ideal dipolar emitters to study such cooperative behaviour. [more]
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