Colloquia


Colloquia

We plan to return partly to in-person talks. These talks will be held in the interim lecture hall B 0.32 at MPQ and can additionally be attended online. Some talks remain online only.

For events in the Lecture hall 2G plus regulations now apply. This means that in order to join an in-person talk, only vaccinated or recovered persons (“2G”) who can show their vaccination certificate or the CovPass App and a valid negative test result (“plus”) are admitted to the Lecture Hall. Vaccinated or recovered persons who have already received their third “booster vaccination” are exempt from the obligation to get tested.
Whether facemasks have to be worn inside the lecture hall will be communicated in the e-mail announcement for each talk separately. In any case, you will need a medical facemask in the hallway. Audience not affiliated with MPQ are welcome to join in person as long as they meet 2G criteria.


Details on how to participate online are distributed via the mailing lists [wiss-mpq] and [Mpq-colloquium-stream]. To receive this information, please register using the adjacent link.

Scientific organization of the talks:  Dr. Stephan Dürr and Dr. Thomas Udem

Quantum stochastic resonance of individual Fe atoms (MCQST-Colloquium) (Prof. Susan Coppersmith)

  • (tentatively in-person)
  • Date: Mar 29, 2022
  • Time: 14:30
  • Speaker: Prof. Susan Coppersmith
  • University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Stochastic resonance, where noise synchronizes a system’s response to an external drive, is a phenomenon that occurs in a wide variety of noisy systems ranging from the dynamics of neurons to the periodicity of ice ages. This talk will present theory and experiments on a quantum system that exhibits stochastic resonance — the quantum tunneling of the magnetization of a single Fe atom measured using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. [more]

Secure communications in quantum networks (MCQST-Colloquium) (Prof. Eleni Diamanti)

  • (tentatively in-person)
  • Date: Feb 15, 2022
  • Time: 14:30
  • Speaker: Prof. Eleni Diamanti
  • FranceCNRS & Paris Centre for Quantum Computing, France
Quantum technologies have the potential to improve in an unprecedented way the security and efficiency of communications in network infrastructures. We discuss the current landscape in quantum communication and cryptography, and focus in particular on recent photonic implementations, using encoding in discrete or continuous properties of light, of central quantum network protocols, enabling secret key distribution, verification of multiparty entanglement and transactions of quantum money, with security guarantees impossible to achieve with only classical resources. [more]

New twists on magnetism in flatland (MCQST-Colloquium) (Prof. Leon Balents)

  • (online)
  • Date: Jan 25, 2022
  • Time: 14:30
  • Speaker: Prof. Leon Balents
  • Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Recent advances allow study of truly two-dimensional physics in atomically thin van der Waals materials. Through examples, I will illustrate how tiny rotations of single atomic layers relative to one another induce new types of magnetism. [more]

Topological plasmonics: Ultrafast vector movies on the nanoscale (Prof. Harald Gießen)

We present an ultrafast vector microscope with 10 nm spatial and subfemtosecond temporal resolution which is capable of mapping all three vector components of the electric field as well as the magnetic field of light on nanophotonic structures. [more]

Unequal Chances and Hostile Workplaces: Sociological Research on Academic Physic (MCQST-Colloquium) (M.A. Valerie Dahl)

  • (online)
  • Date: Dec 7, 2021
  • Time: 14:30
  • Speaker: M.A. Valerie Dahl
  • Institut für Soziologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
In her talk, Valerie Dahl will give insights into sociological, process-oriented research methods as well as methodological approaches, and present her current research on gender-related discrimination in male dominated work fields and intervention strategies of (academic) physicists. [more]
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