Seminars


Seminars

On an irregular basis various Special Seminars take place at the MPQ. The seminars are organized by scientists of our divisions, administration or staff representatives. The location will be announced with the event.
Location: Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
Precision measurements of the Rydberg spectra of H, He and H2 will be presented, which aim at determining their ionization energies and, in the case of H2, also the spin-rovibrational energy-level structure of H2+. These measurements are carried out for comparison with the results of first-principles calculations that include the treatment of finite-nuclear-size effects and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamics corrections up to high order in the fine-structure constant. [more]
The field of quantum computation heavily relies on the belief that quantum computation violates the extended Church Turing thesis, namely, that quantum many-body systems cannot be simulated by classical ones with only polynomial overhead. Importantly, we must ask: what experimental evidence do we have for this bold assumption? A major effort towards providing such evidence had concentrated on random quantum circuit sampling (RCS) as in the famous supremacy experiment by Google from 2019. I will describe a recent work with Gao, Landau, Liu and Vazirani in which we give a polynomial time classical algorithm for simulating such RCS experiments. Our algorithm gives strong evidence that RCS cannot be the basis for near term experimental evidence for scalable exponential quantum advantage. [more]

Special Seminar: "Implications of a matter-antimatter mass asymmetry in Penning-trap experiments" (M.Sc. Ting Cheng)

The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, being a local, unitary and Lorentz-invariant quantum field theory, remains symmetric under the combined action of Charge, Parity, and Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. This automatically implies that fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles should be equal in magnitude. While there are numerous experiments testing CPT symmetry, it is not clear how these tests are related with one another, and hence, if there is a reasonable way to compare bounds arising from them. [more]
Development of quantum hardware and software is progressing rapidly. With the availability of first generally-accessible quantum computers, their potential use for applications can increasingly be explored. One prospective field of application is data science in the medical sector, which faces challenges difficult to address with currently available methods. An example is medical imaging, where frequently only limited training data is available – making the use of classical AI methods difficult. However, presently available quantum computers are still limited in the number of qubits, the connectivity and are affected by noise. [more]
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