Colloquia


Colloquia

We plan to return partly to in-person talks. These talks will be held in the interim lecture hall B 0.32 at MPQ and can additionally be attended online. Some talks remain online only.

2G regulations apply to in-person talks, i.e. every time you wish to participate in person, you will have to prove, e.g. with the CovPass-App, that you are vaccinated or recovered.Whether facemasks have to be worn inside the lecture hall will be communicated in the the e-mail announcement for each talk separately. In any case, you will need a medical facemask in the hallway. Audience not affiliated with MPQ are welcome to join in person as long as they meet 2G criteria.

Details on how to participate online are distributed via the mailing lists [wiss-mpq] and [Mpq-colloquium-stream]. To receive this information, please register using the adjacent link.

Scientific organization of the talks:  Dr. Stephan Dürr and Dr. Thomas Udem

Heavy Neutrinos as a Key to understand the Universe (Prof. Marco Drewes)

Heavy Neutrinos as a Key to understand the Universe
Neutrino flavour oscillations indicate that neutrinos have tiny masses. They are the only firmly established proof of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics that has been observed in the laboratory. Understanding the origin of neutrino masses may therefore provide a key to understand how the Standard Model should be embedded in a more fundamental theory of Nature. [more]

Topological Superconductivity and Majorana Fermions in Coupled Wires (Fan Yang)

Topological Superconductivity and Majorana Fermions in Coupled Wires
In the first part, we present a theoretical study of the interplay between topological p-wave superconductivity, orbital magnetic fields and quantum Hall phases in coupled wire systems. We consider two-dimensional systems made of weakly coupled ladders. There, we engineer a p+ip superconductor with the chiral Majorana edge current and describe a generalization of the ν = 1/2 fractional quantum Hall phase. These phases might be realized in solid-state or cold-atom nanowires. For the second part, we will address the spin ladder analogs of the Kitaev honeycomb model. A generalized phase diagram for the two-leg ladder system is obtained together with a driven time-dependent protocol based on superconducting box circuits. [more]

Complexity in quantum field theory (Dr. Michal Heller)

Complexity in quantum field theory
Recent developments in holography (AdS/CFT) has led to a conjecture that spacetime volume inside a black hole is related to complexity in a dual quantum field theory. This development has provided strong stimulous for understanding definitions and properties of complexity in quantum field theory and I will review some of the results in this emerging area. [more]

Quantum optics and quantum information science in multi-dimensional photonics Networks (Prof. Christine Silberhorn)

Quantum optics and quantum information science in multi-dimensional photonics Networks
Photonic quantum systems, which comprise multiple optical modes as well as highly non-classical and sophisticated quantum states of light, have been investigated intensively in various theoretical pro­posals over the last decades. The ideas cover a large range of different applications in quantum technology, spanning from quantum communication and quantum metrology to quantum simulations and quantum computing. However, the experimental implementations require advanced setups of high complexity, which poses a considerable challenge. The successful realization of controlled quantum network structures is key for the future advancement of the field. [more]

Ultrafast road to extremely efficient chiral light matter interaction ( Prof. Olga Smirnova)

Ultrafast road to extremely efficient chiral light matter interaction
Chirality plays a key role in physics, chemistry and biology. In the molecular world, the non-superimposable mirror twins of the same chiral molecule – the left-handed and right handed enantiomers – have the same physical properties unless they interact with another chiral object. Distinguishing left- and right-handed molecular enantiomers is very challenging, especially on ultrafast time scale, with standard all-optical techniques leading to extremely weak chiral signals. [more]
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