Research News

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Even though quantum communication is tap-proof, it is so far not particularly efficient. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics want to change this. They have developed a detection method that can be used to track quantum transmissions - without destroying the information. more

A new study carried out by a team of laser physicists, molecular biologists and physicians based at LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics has confirmed the temporal stability of the molecular composition of blood in a population of healthy individuals. The data provide a basis for a new method of monitoring the constituents of blood and detecting alterations that reveal changes in a person’s state of health. more

Today’s quantum computers contain up to several dozen memory and processing units, the so-called qubits. Researchers from MPQ have successfully interconnected two such qubits located in different labs to a distributed quantum computer. Their system is the worldwide first prototype of a distributed quantum computer. more

The size of the alpha particle, the nucleus of the helium atom, has been measured more accurately than ever before. Results now indicate a size 1.67824(83) femtometers, which is 4.8 times more precise than previous measurements. The researchers used laser spectroscopy of exotic helium ions, where the electron is replaced by a 200 times heavier muon. more

Physicists at MPQ have tested quantum mechanics to a completely new level of precision using hydrogen spectroscopy, and in doing so they came much closer to solving the well-known proton charge radius puzzle, which is baffling science for more than a decade. more

Physicists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have developed the basic technology for a new "quantum modem". It will allow users to connect to a future quantum internet that is based on the existing fibre optic network infrastructure. more

Our eyes are sensitive to only three spectral color bands (red, green, blue), and we can no longer distinguish colors if it becomes very dark. Spectroscopists can identify many more colors by the frequencies of the light waves, so that they can distinguish atoms and molecules by their spectral fingerprints. Scientists have now recorded broad spectra with close to one hundred thousand colors in almost complete darkness. more

A German-Canadian collaboration, with physicists from the attoworld-team of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, and the Joint Attosecond Science Laboratory of the National Research Council and the University of Ottawa, has discovered a new way of tracing the ultrafast oscillations of the electric field in laser light waves. more

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