Colloquia


Colloquia

We plan to return partly to in-person talks. These talks will be held in the interim lecture hall B 0.32 at MPQ and can additionally be attended online. Some talks remain online only.

2G regulations apply to in-person talks, i.e. every time you wish to participate in person, you will have to prove, e.g. with the CovPass-App, that you are vaccinated or recovered.Whether facemasks have to be worn inside the lecture hall will be communicated in the the e-mail announcement for each talk separately. In any case, you will need a medical facemask in the hallway. Audience not affiliated with MPQ are welcome to join in person as long as they meet 2G criteria.

Details on how to participate online are distributed via the mailing lists [wiss-mpq] and [Mpq-colloquium-stream]. To receive this information, please register using the adjacent link.

Scientific organization of the talks:  Dr. Stephan Dürr and Dr. Thomas Udem

Quantum Logic Spectroscopy with Trapped Ions (Prof. Dr. Dietrich Leibfried)

Quantum Logic Spectroscopy with Trapped Ions
Quantum logic spectroscopy uses the quantized motion of trapped charged particles as a means to indirectly control charged quantum systems and gain information on their properties. A highly controllable atomic "logic" ion indirectly helps to manipulate the system under study and to report information back to the experimenter. This allows for precise quantum control of charged systems that are hard or impossible to directly control with light fields, such as atomic ions without convenient laser cooling transitions, molecular ions or charged elementary particles such as the proton. This talk will introduce the basic ideas behind quantum logic spectroscopy and illustrate its power based on example experiments in the NIST Ion Storage Group. [more]

Synthesizing Light: New Tools, Wavelengths and Opportunities (Prof. Dr. Scott Diddams)

Synthesizing Light: New Tools, Wavelengths and Opportunities
Frequency synthesis is ubiquitous in all aspects of our modern technological society, with examples being found in wide ranging applications from computing, communications and navigation systems to sensors and scientific instrumentation. Historically, the generation and precise control of electromagnetic radiation has been confined to the radio frequency and microwave domains. How­ever, optical frequency combs, first introduced by Prof. T.W. Hänsch, dramatically expand the synthesis bandwidth to cover the entire terahertz and optical domains as well. [more]

Topology in finite‐temperature and non‐equilibrium systems (Prof. Michael Fleischhauer)

Topology in finite‐temperature and non‐equilibrium systems
Topological states of matter have fascinated physicists since a long time due to the exotic properties of elementary excitations and the topological protection of edge states and currents. The notion of topology is ususally associated with ground states of (many-body)-Hamiltonians. [more]

Cold and ultracold molecules for quantum information and particle physics (Prof. John Doyle)

Cold and ultracold molecules for quantum information and particle physics
Wide-ranging scientic applications have created growing interest in ultracold molecules. Heteronuclear bialkali molecules, assembled from ultracold atoms, enabled the study of long-range dipolar interactions and quantum-state-controlled chemistry, and recently have been brought to quantum degeneracy. Assembling such molecules one-byone in tweezers for quantum information applications is one exciting avenue of this work. [more]

Double Feature: One-dimensional superradiant photonic states for quantum information (Dr. Marti Perarnau)

One-dimensional superradiant photonic states for quantum information
Photonic states with large and fixed photon numbers, such as Fock states, are crucial in quantum technologies but remain an experimentally elusive resource. A potentially simple, deterministic and scalable way to generate these states consists of fully exciting N quantum emitters equally coupled to a common photonic reservoir, which leads to a collective decay known as Dicke superradiance. The emitted N-photon wavepacket turns out to be a highly entangled multimode state, which makes its characterisation challenging, and its potential for quantum information an open question. In this talk, after reviewing the basics of superradiance and 1d waveguide QED, I will show that Dicke superradiant states have a high quantum Fisher information (achieving Heisenberg scaling), implying they enable quantum-enhanced metrology. Then, I will discuss possible effective descriptions of such states, which would allow a clean understanding of their properties. [more]
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