contact

Dr. Stephan Dürr
Stephan Dürr
Group Leader
Phone: +49 89 3 29 05 - 291
Room: A 2.22
Prof. Dr. Thomas Udem
Thomas Udem
Scientist
Phone: +49 89 3 29 05 - 282 // -257
Room: D 0.21 // D 0.39




next colloquium

Colloquia

Colloquia

Our series of Colloquium Talks takes place from October till January and from April till July, on Tuesdays, at 2:30 p.m..

Attention! Due to the recontstruction of the foyer at the MPQ talks will take place at the interims Lecuture Hall in Room B 0.32.

Scientific organization of the talks: Dr. Stephan Dürr and Dr. Thomas Udem

If you wish to view the live stream of the MPQ colloquium, please use the link to subscribe to the corresponding mailing list. Detailed instructions will be sent to all subscribers.

Month:

Quantum optics using atomic arrays (Prof. Dr. Darrick Chang)

Ensembles of atoms or other quantum emitters are envisioned to be an important component of quantum applications, ranging from quantum memories for light to photon-photon gates to metrology. It has historically been an outstanding challenge to exactly solve for the quantum dynamics of an optical field as it propagates through and interacts with an ensemble. The standard axiomatic approach is to use the one-dimensional Maxwell-Bloch equations, which assume that excited atoms emit independently into unwanted directions. This ignores the wave interference of the emitted light, which depends on correlations between the atoms. [more]

Superfluidity and Bose-Einstein Condensation Coherence (Prof. Dr. Lev Pitaevskii)

In 1938 Petr Kapitza, investigating properties of the low temperature phase of liquid 4He, discovered that viscosity of the liquid is more than 104 times smaller, than that of all known liquids. Kapitza concluded, that the liquid is in a new state of matter, a “superfluid”, which to some extend analogous to superconductors. Landau (1941) explained the phenomenon and predicted several its unusual properties. It occurs, that in a superfluid in any point of space at finite temperatures simultaneously exists two flow with different velocities. One is “normal” and has finite viscosity and the second one is “superfluid”, which viscosity is exactly zero. This results in presence of two type of sound, which were discovered experimentally in 1946. [more]

Label-free chemical imaging: Unveiling hidden signatures for molecule-based diagnosis and treatment (Prof. Ji-Xin Cheng)

Optical microscopy has been a fundamental tool to life science and materials science since its invention in the 17th century. [more]

Deciphering complex quantum systems (Prof. A. Buchleitner)

Not many ingredients are needed for a quantum system to turn complex, with the helium atom as the arguably most elementary example. [more]

Rotating molecules and fundamental constants (Prof. S. Schiller)

Molecules provide exciting opportunities for precision measurements - significantly extending those offered by atoms. [more]

 
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