Contact

Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
P.O.Box 13 27
D-85741 Garching, Germany

Street address:
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1
D-85748 Garching, Germany

Phone: + 49 (89) 3 29 05 - 0
Fax:    + 49 (89) 3 29 05 - 200

Contact person

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Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng

Leitung Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit/ Head of Press & Public Relations
Phone:+49 89 32905-213

Research News

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Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

July 22, 2016
Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second. [more]
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A signal boost for molecular microscopy

July 12, 2016
Cavity-enhanced Raman-scattering reveals information on structure and properties of carbon nanotubes. [more]
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Quantum processor for single photons

July 07, 2016
MPQ-scientists have realised a photon-photon logic gate via a deterministic interaction with a strongly coupled atom-resonator system. [more]
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Quantum matter without memory loss

July 06, 2016
MPQ scientists obtain evidence of many-body localization in a closed quantum system. [more]
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One impurity to bind them all

June 02, 2016
MPQ researchers show that a single atomic impurity is able to trap infinitely many bosons around it. [more]
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Collapsing energy bands to explore their geometric structure

May 31, 2016
MPQ/LMU scientists devise new interferometer to probe the geometry of band structures. [more]
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Attosecond camera for nanostructures

May 31, 2016
Physicists of the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich in collaboration with scientists from the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have observed a light-matter phenomenon in nano-optics, which lasts only attoseconds. [more]
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A switch for light wave electronics

May 23, 2016
A team of scientists optimized the interaction of light and glass in a way that facilitates its possible future usage for light wave driven electronics. [more]
 
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